Losing Weight; Finding Men

"Never make someone a priority in your life when you are just their option."

Friday, June 13, 2008

Sending Out an SOS

"Sending out an SOS
Sending out an SOS
Sending out an SOS
To you"


Ah yes, thank you Sting, Andy, and Gordon for those um, eloquent...lyrics.

I think maybe an entire 4 people read this blog. Don't really know, don't really want to know actually. However, something has come to my attention that I want to share.

Perhaps I am still shaken by the news article I read about women forced to live in their cars, but my fellow blogger Kate is having a rough time of it in these troubling times. Please, show her some support.

Kate has also designed some fantastic t-shirts, which she sells. Check them out!

_______________________

As for me, I'm sitting here eating my scrambled eggs and the thought just comes over me like a tidal wave:

This would taste so much better with bread.

*sigh*

Yes. It surely would. And the next thought, the very next thought:

Do you really think you could eat just one piece?

And the answer, even after one entire year of relearning and restricting?

Definitely not. I definitely could not eat just one piece of bread.

And THAT my friends is what separates me from some other people who feel as though weight loss is simply about exercise.

Ummmm. Not for me.

So um......

When you could eat an entire loaf of bread in one sitting, that is addictive behavior.

When you know without a doubt that you'd still rather eat a box of pasta than a breast of chicken, that is addictive behavior.

When you smell your co-worker's lunch in the microwave and know from 30 feet away that there is rice involved, that is addictive behavior.

Maybe I should write a "You might be a carb addict if...." Can someone get Jeff Foxworthy on the phone? I think his career is dead and last I saw he was hanging out with 5th graders.

_______________________

Edited to add this note from Kate. I know that the blog comments don't show up unless someone clicks on the link and this seemed too important to me -- I want anyone who reads this entry to read her comments:

"Thank you so much for highlighting this plight. I'm glad I don't live in Santa Barbara, because I know how expensive housing is. When I left my husband, I lived in my car for 6 months until I could get a place in a shelter. Once I was in the shelter, I could get a job again and get an apartment.

What most people don't realize is that we're all only --->THIS<--- far from being there. An illness, a family emergency, a natural disaster, and any one of us can lose everything. I've been going through an especially hard time this month. Now I have subsidized housing, but I know in some cities families wait for YEARS for housing. Of course, I still had to pay deposits and pet deposit and all the rest, which is part of what made this month so difficult.

But I'll be honest: part of the reason I drive a van is because if this program ever was eliminated, we'd be living there.

One of the things I'll write about eventually (I've written about it on other blogs) is how the poor eat, and what food pantries and soup kitchens feed the poor. Your comment about bread brought that all back to me, because in many places the poor do live on bread and water (and in many cases, cake)

Carbs make me hungry, they don't fill me. I don't keep a lot of carbs in the house, but it's the first thing you get in the pantry, and used to be when you got food stamps they'd tell you to cut everything with bread or rice. Now when I went to the pantry yesterday I was allowed to chose my breads, and took all sourdough, which I can't stand and the kids love. That's my way of keeping carb free while eating poor.

So when my check DID come yesterday, I went out and got some whole wheat flatbread wraps, turkey, and Romaine lettuce... and the sandwich has all the carbs I eat."

2 comments:

Fab Kate said...

Thank you so much for highlighting this plight. I'm glad I don't live in Santa Barbara, because I know how expensive housing is. When I left my husband, I lived in my car for 6 months until I could get a place in a shelter. Once I was in the shelter, I could get a job again and get an apartment.

What most people don't realize is that we're all only --->THIS<--- far from being there. An illness, a family emergency, a natural disaster, and any one of us can lose everything. I've been going through an especially hard time this month. Now I have subsidized housing, but I know in some cities families wait for YEARS for housing. Of course, I still had to pay deposits and pet deposit and all the rest, which is part of what made this month so difficult.

But I'll be honest: part of the reason I drive a van is because if this program ever was eliminated, we'd be living there.

One of the things I'll write about eventually (I've written about it on other blogs) is how the poor eat, and what food pantries and soup kitchens feed the poor. Your comment about bread brought that all back to me, because in many places the poor do live on bread and water (and in many cases, cake)

Carbs make me hungry, they don't fill me. I don't keep a lot of carbs in the house, but it's the first thing you get in the pantry, and used to be when you got food stamps they'd tell you to cut everything with bread or rice. Now when I went to the pantry yesterday I was allowed to chose my breads, and took all sourdough, which I can't stand and the kids love. That's my way of keeping carb free while eating poor.

So when my check DID come yesterday, I went out and got some whole wheat flatbread wraps, turkey, and Romaine lettuce... and the sand which has all the carbs I eat.

Carolina Girl said...

That is so sad. I'm glad you posted about this. I am going to check out Kate's blog.

Also, I completely sympathize with the eating just one slice of bread plight. That's me and everything good - I can't just eat one cup of ice cream. I have to eat the entire carton - until I'm sick! I don't know why I do that. But alas, me and ice cream had to break up. I had some yummy raisin bread recently - and I ate about 6 slices before the end of the day. It's so frustrating, isn't it!? That is why I keep nothing but fruits and veggies in my house these days. I sadly cannot be trusted with the "good stuff".

you're like butter to me

Just a Lovable Party Girl

Just a Lovable Party Girl
Sagittarius is born to travel the world and move upwards and outwards. Naturally gregarious, they love the idea of meeting different people and understanding foreign cultures. There is also a desire to broaden the mind too, with the possibility of many Sagittarians being lifelong students. Their outlook is generally optimistic and there is a distinct lack of concern over the smaller, practical details. A great sense of humor and a lack of petty mindedness are Sagittarian qualities too. Sagittarius is open -- open-minded, open-hearted and generous, up to a point. They like to get value and will not be quite so impulsive with their cash but they do have a natural ability to get on with people from many varied walks of life. They have an innate sense of wanting to help others and give them a hand up the ladder and can be wonderful and exciting companions. Expect an honest answer when you ask a question and maybe some long philosophic discussions into the night. Jovial, optimistic, versatile, open-minded, philosophical, sincere, frank, visionary.